Dover Quartet - Reviews

Due to the copyright restrictions in Germany and Switzerland these are only a few reviews which we are explicitly allowed to use. Unfortunately, for this reason a large number of press reviews may not be used at the moment.

  • The Sunday Times – CD Mozart

  • “This deeply affecting debut disc is a tribute to the renowned Guarneri Quartet, with whom the Dovers studied, and whose violist, Michael Tree, joins them in the third of three Mozart items: the great Quintet in C minor, which he adapted from his wind octet Serenade, K388. The other pieces -- Mozart's final string quartets, the second and third of his ‚Prussian‘ three, with their lyrically enhanced cello lines - are performed here with surpassing beauty, a glorious timbral richness governed by what feels a continuous thoughtfulness.” (Paul Driver, 11.12.16)

  • The Washington Post - CD Mozart

  • “This recording remains an impressive debut by a highly gifted young group, and generous to boot, with 73 minutes of music. No, the Dover isn’t yet the Second Coming, but this recording shows why it has garnered so many accolades already - and whets the appetite for the group’s concert at the Kennedy Center on Monday.” (Robert Battey, 06.01.17)

  • Pizzicato - CD Mozart

  • “After a series of historically informed and finely shaped recordings of Mozart’s chamber music, it’s really good to hear one so dynamic, virtuoso and immediately appealing performance. Mozart con brio!“ (21.12.16, Alain Steffen)

  • www.seenandheard-international.com - Vancouver

  • „The Dover rides even higher | Their Dvorak ‘American’ Quartet revealed great strides in both refinement and balance, and their ability to convey an intimacy in their playing. It is easy to overpower this work and push it forward with a fulsome vigour that is simply not part of the Czech idiom. The first two movements were almost perfection in combining an inward beauty and restraint with a natural enthusiasm. The music was often quietly projected, yet had such a lovely tonal and rhythmic balance that that the work moved forward effortlessly, and with the right tinge of melancholy too. [...] In Berg’s op. 3, what especially impressed was the cohesion of the interpretation, full of structural awareness and judicious pacing to underpin the expressive fabric. Lines were always cleanly drawn, yet full of the right sort of angst and dramatic fervour when needed.” (Geoffrey Newman, 25.10.15)

  • Dresdner Neueste Nachrichten - Dresden Music Festival

  • "Enthusiastic and exuberant – the sonorous tones of Mozart's K. 499 wandered through the room and unfolded their overwhelming charm. [...] The Dover Quartet played Kaija Saariaho's 'Terra memoria' particularly grippingly, delivering an enthralling performance. Rising up, they opposed misdeeds and forgetting with vital strength. They also gave an outstanding rendering of Grieg's string quartet, endowing the piece with pure liveliness, which met with much enthusiasm.” (Wolfram Quellmalz, 20.05.15)

  • Schwetzinger Woche - Schwetzingen Festival

  • "The Dover Quartet is one of the best American chamber music ensembles of all times. [...] They were absolute door openers here. Although smiling in the photo on the programme, they pursue their craft with utmost seriousness and dedication. Their performances seem so authoritative, almost as if they are carved in stone.” (www.lokalmatador.de/storage/2/7953189f7ec544c2b85015f68853266e/7953189f7ec544c2b85015f68853266e.pdf)

  • Badische Zeitung

  • "With the first chords of Mozart's String Quartet in D major, K. 499, is is already clear – the musicians are putting their entire being into their instruments. No exaggerated gestures, no posturing around wildly. But a sound like a unique entity, as if one musician were playing one instrument. Masterly. Full of tender clarity, they pass Mozart's motifs from one musician to the next, never in danger of sounding syrupy sweet." (sno, 12.5.15, www.badische-zeitung.de/klassik-2/vier-musiker-in-transzendierendem-einklang--104677613.html)

  • The Calgary Herald - Concert at the Banff Centre

  • “It was a concert not to be missed, if only for the chance to hear once more the Dover Quartet’s unmistakeable glowing sound, near-flawless technique, immaculate phrasing and an obvious sympatico for every note and chord they play. [...]The audience had plenty of golden moments to choose from, whether it was refined playing, impassioned ensemble work, weighted attacks, a gorgeous cello solo in the G major second theme group from Camden Shaw, or the secure harmonic sense of phrasing issued forth from the finest young quartet in recital anywhere today. The power of the Dover Quartet to communicate a work with awesome sophistication borders on the spiritual. What is most remarkable is this quartet’s ability to shift timbres and even appear, improbably, to shift their core blend, effectively becoming chameleons of sound and allowing them to effectively interpret any composer they wish and in any style of playing. [...] Here was music making at its finest, not only in its inarguable artistry but also with an abundance of considered musicianship.” (Stephan Bonfield, 2.8.14)

  • National Post - Toronto

  • “The Dover Quartet was confident, sinewy playing of distinctive sound and ample nuance. You can even add maturity into the mix of compliments, curiously enough given that the players are in their mid-20s. They obviously understood the multiple levels of meaning in the finale of Haydn’s Quartet Op. 76 No. 1 in G Major. A start in the minor is the first of many quirks in this remarkable movement. Scowls must seem not entirely earnest; trills must bark more than they bite. All this came across. The start-and-stop coda had the crowd chuckling - more than 200 years after the composer first told the joke. [...] Terrific quartet.” (Arthur Kaptainis, 18.11.14)

  • The Washington Post

  • “Conservatories are churning out young new string quartets at a dizzying rate, but lovers of chamber music should put the Dover Quartet on their to-hear list. […] The Dover’s Kennedy Centre debut was a triumph […]. In Mozart’s ‘Hoffmeister’ quartet (D major, K. 499) the sound was lambent and evenly balanced, with the musicians delighting in uncovering this near-perfect score’s musical details and, tellingly, enjoying hearing one another play it. The menuetto, which can be a throwaway movement in some performances, was quick-pulsed and fun, and the slow movement delectably phrased.” (Charles T. Downey, 9.10.14, www.washingtonpost.com)

  • Musical America Woldwide

  • „Musicians in their 20s are often described as ‘emerging’. For the Dover Quartet forget ‘emerging’. That train has left the station. [...] Immediately striking to a listener was their unity of purpose. Entrances in the Schubert were delicious, even on a melting pianissimo. The full cello tone had a center that some players struggle for years to find.” (Leslie Kandell, 1.3.14)

  • Dolomiten – Musik Meran

  • „A sensation in Meran! [...] Starting with W. A. Mozart's E-flat major quartet, these four young Americans guided us into the world of an incredible genius, articulating the contrapuntal strand of his 'Leggerezza' with clear, pure intonation and a wonderful, cantabile, Mozartean tone. With strict articulations, even the most beautiful of phrasings becomes an event when the major-minor world excitingly bursts out from the humorous relaxation at the end. This sensation of total excitement - or even of being stunned into paralysis - appears of course again in the Dmitri Shostakovich's Third String Quartet from 1946. [...] It simply could not be any better; Mendelssohn's fluctuating sound worlds were portrayed with overwhelming intensity and the quartet's expression and phrasing were rife with fine details. The Meraner audience celebrated the artists' extraordinary and spontaneous musicality with many rounds of applause!”

  • The Strad - String Quartet Competition in Banff 2013 - First Prize

  • “The American Dover Quartet handled the extremes of the music [Beethoven op.59/2] successfully and ultimately truly inhabited this music, contrasting trenchancy wit playfulness, muscularity with delicacy. […] What’s quite scary about the Dover is that the players have only just graduated. They formed at the Curtis Institute in 2008 as 19-year-old students. They are clearly excellent players both individually and collectively. This competition could well be the launch pad for a long and illustrious career.”

  • The Strad

  • “The Dover Quartet from the US followed, four years old, with an average age of less than 23 but with a clutch of prizes and a CD already in the locker. The first movement of op.132 in A minor was a muscular affair, full of subtle details of phrasing and pacing, and the Allegro ma non tanto had a leisurely sway. The great central Molto adagio was sublime, with sustained playing and often minimal vibrato in the hymn section, and elfin lightness elsewhere. Vivid dynamic contrasts featured in the finale.“

  • Calgary Herald - Finalrunde des Banff-Wettbewerbs

  • “Theirs was not only the best Beethoven performance of yesterday afternoon’s final round, offering up an unforgettably professional second Razumovsky quartet in E minor, but they also took the Haydn prize, the Schubert prize and the prize for best performance of the Canadian co-commisioned work by Vivian Fung. […] What separated the Dover Quartet from the others was their consistent attention to detail entrenched in an indisputably proficient musicality that frequently communicated itself effectively and powerfully. […] The Dover Quartet made this Razumovsky 2 completely accessible in its lyricism, subtlety of dynamics, carefully thought-through phrasing, and above all, always displaying that trademark Dover sound that we had all come to love here throughout the week. There were moments where their string timbres seemed to dissolve away and transmute into human vocal utterance. Their seemingly innate understanding of Beethoven’s language and the intrinsic power it has to communicate was amply demonstrated and perpetually on display in all movements. It was, for all intents and purposes, the afternoon’s acme demonstrating exactly how Beethoven ought to be played.”