Signum Quartett - Presse

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  • www.lalettredumusicien.fr - Paris Cité de la musique

  • « Ces soufflets [...] révèlent ce que Signum a de meilleur : concentration absolue, netteté de la mise en place, autorité du premier violon, propulsion impeccable des cellules rythmiques, équilibre des timbres. » (Frédéric Gaussin, 13.2.14, www.lalettredumusicien.fr/s/articles/2850_0_de-mozart-a-widman-le-quatuor-signum-a-paris)

  • Fonoforum - CD Quartettsätze

  • « Un enregistrement puissant d’une signature particulière. » (Marcus Stäbler, Mars 2012)

  • La Marseillaise

  • « [Le quatuor Signum] s’est montré à la hauteur des éloges qu’on en avait entendus. […] A un Mozart classique mais bien fait succéda un ‘Mouvement lent’ de Webern d’une grande beauté, avec un premier violon réveur ou intense, qui valait vraiment l’audition. […] Le Quatuor No.13 de Dvorak […] donna encore au quatuor Signum l’occasion de montrer une grande sensibilité, des attaques nettes, des contrastes et des nuances. »

  • The Irish Examiner - Westcork Festival

  • “I only heard the Signum quartet twice. On the first occasion, they played Schumann’s 2nd quartet in F with a warmth of tone, affection for the music, and unanimity of expressiveness that was of the highest international quality. Clarinettist, Christoffer Sundqvist joined them on the second occasion, playing Weber’s marvellously entertaining Quintet for Clarinet and Strings. The playing was superb, all of the players revelling in this perfectly imagined work.”

  • Gramophone - CD No.3

  • “Schnittke’s Third Quartet from 1983 is an ideal vehicle for this ensemble and comes over impressively in a well-judged recording.”

  • The Strad - CD No.3

  • “The Signum Quartet players have a nice way with Berg’s shifting musical landscapes [op.3], their pacing sure, their palette broad, wonderfully gentle at times, muscular at others. Bartok’s Third Quartet receives a deft performance, with supple melodic lines and tremendous gritty in the Allegro second movements. […] This is an engaging performance, assimilating a diverse collection of styles into a compelling whole, beautiful and complex.”

  • www.classicalsource.com - BBC Proms - 26 August 2013

  • “String Quartet No.3 by Maconchy unfolds continuously through five sections. It begins with the slow undulation of a motif built upon the interval of a second. The two violinists brought a mellow sonority to this passage whenever it appeared by playing high up on the G-string in emulation of a viola’s tone. This section is succeeded by a more dynamic one in which the seconds were inverted to form a sequence of lunging sevenths. After the Signum Quartet’s relaxed presentation of the opening, its members preferred not to venture into too violent a manner for the faster sections. This meant that there was a consistency of emotional purpose throughout the performance, bringing the forlorn serenade-like central section within its ambit completely naturally.” (Curtis Rogers, 26.8.13)

  • The Independant - BBC Proms - 26 August 2013

  • “The Signum Quartett and Hadland excel in Brahms. Owing more to the influence of Bartok than to that of her tutor Ralph Vaughan Williams, its vibrant eloquence [Elisabeth Maconchy’s string quartet No.3] was beautifully rendered by the Signum Quartet, who were then joined by Christian Ihle Hadland for a stunning account of Brahms’s Piano Quintet in F major.” (Michael Church, 26.8.13)

  • The Boston Globe

  • “... subtle and balanced...”

  • www.classical-scene.com - Boston

  • “The Signum Quartet is a distinctive German ensemble with a youthful energy and an Old World sound. … Violinists Kerstin Dill and Annette Walther, violist Xandi van Dijk and cellist Thomas Schmitz gave a touching performance [of Haydn’s op.76/2] that brought out the dark colors and rhetorical resonances of this music. Haydn’s humor, particularly evident in the finale, is deeply humane and imbedded in the structure of the music: he effectively sets up little musical jokes for later punctuation.”

  • www.classicalsource.com - Wigmore Hall London

  • “This performance suggested the spontaneity of the music flowing as if from a writer’s pen. The balance between the musicians was extremely good, emphasising Schumann’s equal treatment of the four instruments […]. The depth of detail [in Brahms’s op.51 No .1] was vigorously explored; not only through virtuosity but with wit, too.”